Milo: Well, Would YOU Let This Dangerous Radical Near Your Vulnerable Schoolchildren?

Milo Yiannopoulos has been banned from speaking at his old school, Simon Langton grammar in Kent.

Not by the teachers –  who were naturally eager to hear his views on Donald Trump, free speech and the alt right (quite topical at the moment…). Not by the children, more than 200 of whom had already signed up to hear his talk. But by a hitherto unknown section of Britain’s Department of Education called the “counter-extremism task force.”

So secretive is this “counter-extremism task force” that it is now denying responsibility for the ban which it effected.

Here’s the weaselly statement issued by the Department of Education:

When concerns are raised by members of the public following media coverage in advance of an event, the department would contact the school as a matter of routine to check they had considered any potential issues. The decision to cancel the event was a matter for the school.

Hmm. That isn’t what the teachers are saying. They wanted Milo to come, apparently, but were overruled by this mystery section of a government ministry which presumably – to judge by its name – was established mainly to protect children from dangerous terrorists.

It’s true that Milo does advertise himself as “dangerous”. But he is using the term ironically in order to mock the hypocrisy and hysteria of the regressive left – and its ludicrous belief that anyone who doesn’t share its political outlook must therefore be a fascist and a menace to society.

The real problem the liberal-left has with Milo – and I entirely understand this fear – is that he is so eloquent, charming, well-informed and articulate. They cannot rebut his arguments so instead they demonise him.

His recent encounter with Channel 4 newsreader Cathy Newman is a case in point. For the last few days, Cathy – an ardent feminist – has been crowing about all the tweets she has been sent congratulating her on having performed so well against this terrible person.

Here are some examples:

Read the rest at Breitbart.

How the BBC censored my monstrous, hideously offensive ‘Irish joke’ | James Delingpole

August 15, 2010

On Any Questions I apparently told a joke so offensive that it had to be censored by the BBC.

I say “apparently” because I wasn’t even aware I’d told a joke, let alone one worthy of censorship, till I discovered that the BBC had cut it out of the Saturday lunchtime repeat of the programme.

Typical Irishmen, yesterday

Typical Irishmen, yesterday

The “offensive joke” was something I’d said while prefacing some remarks about our wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. I referred to the Irishman who, when asked for directions says: “If you want to get there you don’t want to start from here.”

I suppose if I’d considered it a joke, I might have essayed an Irish accent, or prefaced it with “Sure” or “Begorrah” or “Bejaysus, shor” or some such, and maybe done a little jig with my hands stapled to my sides while drinking a pint of Guinness and wearing a St Patrick’s Day comedy shamrock hat and then left a little gap afterwards so that the audience could express their delight in gales of laughter. But as far as I understand it – as, indeed, I believe most sane people understand it – is that it’s one of those old sayings, more often than not told by the Irish themselves, to illustrate a kind of perverse, quirky, counterintuitive streak that makes the Irish way of thinking so comically, lovably Irish.

This isn’t to say that I’m in any way against the telling of Irish jokes nor that I would have refrained from telling one if I could have thought of an appropriate one on Any Questions. All I’m saying that on this particular occasion I wasn’t telling an Irish joke, let alone an offensive one. The fact that the BBC is so foolish enough to believe otherwise speaks volumes about the culture of political correctness, hypersensitivity and gratuitous offence-taking in which we now live.

My friend Douglas Murray writes of even worse experiences – again at the hands of chippy Irish grievance mongers – in the Spectator this week.

If this is where we’re going, truly I fear for our country even more than I was doing already when I woke up this morning to read in my paper that David Cameron has pronounced himself happier to be governing in a Brokeback Coalition with a bunch of bizarre, Lib Dem ecofreaks and crypto Communists than he would have been had he won a Conservative majority.

Related posts:

  1. Britain: still stuffed under joke Tories
  2. Nick Clegg’s riot inquiry panel is beyond a joke
  3. Giles Coren says: ‘Climate Change. It’s SNOW joke!!!’
  4. Just what is it that greens like George Monbiot find so offensive about prosperity, abundance, happiness?

3 thoughts on “How the BBC censored my monstrous, hideously offensive ‘Irish joke’”

  1. Peter Walsh says:15th August 2010 at 1:46 pmThe BBC should grow a sense of humour, and while they are at that, maybe they should also grow an ability to present a balanced view on one of your favourite subjects, AGW. That Irish joke is as old as the hills. It is still funny. I am Irish and have absolutely no problem with your passing it on. Do you think they need a humour implant over there?
  2. bigkenny says:16th August 2010 at 5:59 amI can understand why you are enraged, Mr Delingpole, but its hardly surprising. This country is well on the way to the dogs. The BBC is barely worth listening to anymore. You will soon not be able to joke, or look at anyone in the street, or anywhere else. We are all to be Zombies. Mr Murrays piece in the Spectator, was downright frightening.
  3. forthurst says:22nd August 2010 at 2:12 pmDelingpole is far worse than a xenophobe; he is the mangler of a good joke. The Irishman said, “If I were you, I wouldn’t start from here.”