Talking the Trump Revolution with Ted Malloch – ‘Clear Another Space on Mt Rushmore…’

malloch
AP/Frank Augstein

Donald Trump is going to win a second term in 2020: you read it here, first.

I, in turn, heard it straight from the lips of an administration insider – Dr Ted Malloch, the business economics professor and prospective US ambassador to the European Union, who advised Trump from the early stages of his presidential campaign, and whom I’ve interviewed for this week’s Delingpole podcast.

Malloch is an ardent conservative of impeccable pedigree. I asked him what message he had for all those NeverTrump conservative types who still maintain that Hillary would have made the better President.

Malloch: Get over it and move on. It’s what we’ve got. And guess what? It’s not for four years – it’s gonna be for eight years. He has already instigated his re-election campaign and I think I’ll break to you what the motto’s going to be. Can you guess?

Delingpole: Um – Make America Great Again Again?

Malloch: Keep America Great. Which has a certain assumption built into it: that during the next four years we’re going to achieve a great deal. And that then we just have to maintain that kind of trajectory. So this argument about what kind of conservative Trump is – is he a purist? – first of all he’s not a political philosopher and doesn’t purport to be an intellectual…This is not your father’s Oldsmobile. This is not your father’s Republican party. This is Donald Trump’s Republican party and it’s going to be a party that is more pragmatic, that is less ideological, that is more oriented towards national identity, towards States-centric international relations and towards a degree of populism. So I would say ‘Like it or leave it.’

Read the rest at Breitbart.

The One Where James Smokes Weed with Dave; Gets Told Off for Talking Like Trump

You’ll especially enjoy the bit at the end where I let slip a Trumpian crudity, get told off by Isabel, and am forced to pay for her lunch as a punishment.

Also, you’ll hear the true story of how she persuaded me to go on the record about my youthful drug indiscretions with David Cameron for her unauthorised biography – co-written with Lord Ashcroft – Call Me Dave.

Basically – spoiler alert – it’s because I’m a fan. When she’s on BBC Question Time Oakeshott is one of the very few panellists you can always rely on to talk straight. This is much, much harder than you think: it requires balls of steel and an indifference to what other people think bordering on the autistic.

Everyone at home always thinks they could do better but when you’re sitting there with the cameras and a (usually) hostile audience in front of you, it’s all too tempting to mouth platitudes that will earn you a round of applause. The technical term for this is “virtue-signalling”. It is, of course, disgusting, insincere and makes for extremely dull viewing – but almost everyone does it, politicians especially. (The only politician who never does it is Nigel Farage: telling it exactly like it is is his brand.)

Another of Oakeshott’s strengths is that she rarely displays any obvious urge to suck up to the Establishment. I shan’t name names but I’ve never failed to be mildly nauseated by the way so many of my journalistic contemporaries have trimmed their sails over the years, according to whichever bunch of shysters happen to be holding the reins of power. It’s understandable, I suppose, for journalists – political ones especially – to want simultaneously to feel part of the Inner Circle and not sound too remote from the prevailing political fashions. But it makes for damn dull journalism; dishonest, compromised journalism too.

Oakeshott doesn’t believe in career safety. It was a tremendous risk, you could argue, for her to team up with David Cameron’s avowed antagonist Lord Ashcroft to write an unauthorised biography at a time when Cameron was still a figure of some significance and expected to crown what was then thought to be a successful Prime Ministerial career by winning the EU Referendum for the Remain camp.

But she clearly prefers to be with the bad boys and the troublemakers, such as Farage’s mate and backer Arron Banks – with whom she recently co-wrote The Bad Boys of Brexit.

Despite Trump, despite Brexit, the liberal elite of the old Establishment is still very powerful – and more than capable of sabotaging the populist revolution that has made 2016 such a good year for most of us in this parish.

I’m still by no means convinced, for example, that the current British government can really be trusted to do the right thing with so many Remainers – including the Prime Minister Theresa May, and the Chancellor Philip Hammond – in the cabinet.

Entrenched Establishments will go to any lengths to protect their privilege as we saw in the immediate aftermath of Brexit when the Remain camp recovered its grip far more quickly than the Leave faction did – as it showed by sticking the knife into the Brexiteers’ main surviving prime ministerial candidate Andrea Leadsom with a ruthlessness I still find gobsmacking.

We discuss this in the podcast – Oakeshott feels as strongly about this one as I do. Yes, you could argue that the Brexiteers brought disaster on themselves as a result of the Blue-on-Blue action when Michael Gove took Boris Johnson and, as a consequence, himself out of the race.

Read the rest at Breitbart.

Brexit: Shakespeare Was Dead Right About Lawyers…

Dan Kitwood/Getty
“Kill all the lawyers.”

This has got to be my favourite line from Shakespeare – especially after the British High Court’s decision on the EU Referendum whereby a trio of left-leaning activist judges were able to overturn the democratic will of 17.4 million people by ruling: “No. That thing you all voted for. You can’t have it because obscure technical detail…”

Some cynics saw this coming a mile off, among them the redoubtable Peter Hitchens.

Before the referendum he correctly predicted what he now calls “the greatest constitutional crisis since the Abdication of Edward VIII.”

If – as I think we will – we vote to leave the EU on June 23, a democratically elected Parliament, which wants to stay, will confront a force as great as itself – a national vote, equally democratic, which wants to quit. Are we about to find out what actually happens when an irresistible force meets an immovable object?’

I’m not as pessimistic as Peter Hitchens, partly because no one ever could be, and partly because I don’t want to give succour to the enemy.

Face it, we Brexiteers have enjoyed more than four deliriously happy months bathing in bitter Remainer tears, feeding on their sorrow like misery-sucking vampires, relishing every moment of their denials, their tantrums, their toys-cast-from-prams. So it’s only natural that with the roles temporarily reversed, the Remaintards should seize their brief moment in the sun and begin crowing as if somehow those three lefty ponces in ermine (or whatever it is that left-wing High Court Judges wear: thongs? Gimp suits?) were now going to stop us exiting the EU.

What’s very important, though, in these circumstances is for us not to show we’re upset, like the Remaintards have been doing since June 24. As I delicately put it on Twitter yesterday, they’re already beating themselves off pretty frenziedly as it is – and the very last thing we should do is give them any more masturbatory material.

Anyway, I interrupted myself: the real purpose of this piece was to use a topical news item about Brexit as an excuse to reiterate how much I loathe and detest lawyers.

Some of them, it’s true, are my best friends – but that’s pretty inevitable if you’re university educated: of course lots of your contemporaries will inevitably have gone to the dark side. But doesn’t mean that I don’t view their profession in much the way I view the giant orange slugs that destroy my vegetable patch or the evil squirrels which insinuate their way into my fruit cage and eat my strawberries or the fungal infections I sometimes get between my toes or the swollen mite with a mauve body and purple legs I once found clinging to my left testicle in a bucket shower in the Western Sudan in 1984. And at least with a bit of soap and gentle easing I got rid of the mite; at least I can squash the slugs and decapitate the squirrels in my squirrel trap. Lawyers on the other hand just won’t go away…

Which is as good a way as any of introducing my latest Breitbart podcast with this week’s guest Gary Bell.

Read the rest at Breitbart.

Corby: Should I Stand?

Augean troughers and reptiles

Would you really want this man as your local MP?

There’s a mischievous online campaign now fast gaining momentum urging that I should stand in the Corby by-election following Louise Mensch’s shock (well, actually not that shocking) decision to abandon the sinking ship SS Coalition.

I’m torn, I must say.

On the one hand I’m moving to Northamptonshire anyway next week and I’d certainly love to do my bit in parliament to help Chris Heaton-Harris MP with his campaign to stop this gorgeous and much-underrated county becoming the wind farm capital of Britain. (Note that phrase “gorgeous and much-underrated”. Seems I’m catching the politician’s smarm bug already….). Also, though I can’t claim to have taken quite as many drugs as Louise Mensch apparently has, I did make a pretty heroic go of it in my younger, longer-haired days – as fans of my Thinly Disguised Autobiography will know.

On the other hand, I’m skint, I’d stand no hope of getting a cabinet position in the Cameron administration (face it: he’s not my biggest fan) and in any case I just don’t think I’d be cynical or sleazy enough to get on in the current Tory party.

Then again, if I did stand it wouldn’t be as a Tory anyway. No way would I want to belong to the same party as such Augean troughers and reptiles as Tim Yeo MP or the even more noisome Lord Deben (formerly John Selwyn Gummer). If I stood – if they’d have me – it would have to be for UKIP whose manifesto gels so perfectly with my own political values I might almost have written it myself.

Until recently Nigel Farage used to describe UKIP as the “Conservative party in exile” and saw the party’s function mainly as the Tories’ conscience, to keep them on the straight and narrow. Over dinner the other night – no: we weren’t talking about my candidature – though, I discovered that his position had hardened. He now sees UKIP as a viable political party not just at the 2014 EU elections (when it will assuredly win the most seats) but also in the next few general elections here in Britain.

I totally understand his shift in thinking. Thanks to David Cameron, the Conservative party in Britain is dead in the water. There’s only one possible thing he could do to save it which is to fall on his sword before the next election and allow Boris Johnson or Gove to take the reins. But since he won’t – doing the decent thing has never really been Cameron’s schtick – Labour will certainly win the next election, if necessary in coalition with the Lib Dems who will then gerrymander the boundaries and tinker with the constitution to ensure that the Tories can never win a working majority again.

Really, so totally unConservative have the Conservatives become in every way (apart from on education) I find it astonishing that any conservative could consider voting for them. But then if I were an old Labour man – and I have a lot more respect for socialists than I do for liberals – I would feel much the same about the way Labour has gone. Instead of being the party which champions the rights of the working man and woman, Labour has become the party of the welfare class, the public sector parasite and the vampire squid quangocracy.

We need a new kind of politics in this country. None of the current three main parties is offering us any viable alternative to the doomed political “consensus” of statism, money-printing, overregulation, corporatism, banksterism, gag-making political correctness and environmental tyranny.

UKIP, on the other hand, has something to offer everyone – both those on the traditional right and on the old left.

Do I really want to be an MP? Probably not. Hateful job, hideous place – like a cross between a very minor public school and a 70s Berni Inn, vile creepy people, long hours and (unless you’re say, Tim Yeo MP) crap money.

Oh and there’s another factor which might rule me way out of contention: I speak rather too honestly for my own good.

Related posts:

  1. What BBC Radio 2’s Chris Evans thinks about global warming
  2. The orgy of greed spoiling our countryside: why I campaigned in Corby
  3. Richard Madeley reveals that the green blight has finally sunk Cornwall
  4. Hollywood fracks up

 

Don’t Vote For Hannan’s Crappy Blog

Obviously I never read Dan Hannan’s blogs, but if I did I might have come upon one today in which he draws his readers’ (yes, both of them) attention to the Total Politics Award for the Best Political Blog. In his usual shameless way, he is hacking for your votes.

Well I’m above all that. Vote for me if you like. Don’t vote for me if you don’t like. Never ever would I say something like “VOTE FOR ME, JAMES DELINGPOLE, FOR I AM YOUR GOD EMPEROR and here’s the link” because that would be a Hannan-ish thing to do. So I won’t.

Related posts:

  1. Vote Delingpole! Vote often!
  2. Why would anyone want to vote Tory? (pt II)
  3. Reason no 12867 why not to vote Tory: the NHS
  4. Rod Liddle knows even less about Climate Change than I do about Millwall FC