The £147 BBC Licence Fee Is a Tax on the Poor to Pay for Chris Evans’ Latest Ferrari

In order to protect the £2.25million salary of an irritating millionaire, squads of bullies are paid to hunt down those who don’t pay the unfair fee.

WOULD you rather go to prison than contribute to Chris Evans’ next vintage Ferrari?

Preposterously, this is a genuine choice.

Chris Evans
GOFF PHOTOS. Is it fair that people can be thrown in jail for refusing to pay for Chris Evans’ next luxury car?

Suppose last year you accidentally watched his brief, disastrous stint as ­Jeremy Clarkson’s replacement on Top Gear, and suppose in disgust you had refused to pay your £147 BBC licence fee.

First you’d have been given a fine of up to £1,000 — and if you still couldn’t, or wouldn’t, cough up then next you’d face a stint behind bars and a criminal record.

Is this fair? To anyone outside Britain, it’s not just unfair but sheer insanity.

The marvellous thing about our ancient justice system, we’re always told, is that it protects rich and poor without fear or favour.

Yet here we have a situation in which, in order to protect the £2.25million (approx) salary of an irritating millionaire, squads of bullies are paid to hunt down defaulters with such aggression and zeal you’d think they were hunting fugitive serial killers.

Read the rest in the Sun.