Trump’s ‘Rhetoric’ Caused All This Violence, New Yorker Editor Explains

President Donald Trump speaks during the "White House State Leadership Day Conference for Alaska, California, and Hawaii," Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
AP Photo/Evan Vucci

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New Yorker editor David Remnick has weighed in on the debate about who’s really behind the tension and violence racking the U.S. right now…

…aaaand it’s Donald Trump.

Remnick writes:

No one suggests that he is a perpetrator, but pipe bombs as a tool of political intimidation do not arrive unexpectedly.

Yes, that’s right, David. “No one” is suggesting that the president was personally responsible for creating all those “pipe bombs”  for the simple reason that anyone who did suggest such a thing would rightly be classed as insane.

Read the rest on Breitbart.

Murdered Cats. Poison Jam. Yes, Our Villages ARE Hotbeds of Malice! As Midsomer Murders Writer Claims Evil Flourishes in the Countryside, One Writer Says He Cannot Disagree

  • Anthony Horowitz claims nowhere is more evil than an English village
  • The former Midsomer Murders screenwriter has spoken out on the subject
  • He says rural areas can naturally breed mistrust, suspicion and bitterness

Nowhere is more evil than an English village,’ declares author Anthony Horowitz, approvingly quoting Sherlock Holmes.

And having moved from the crime-infested badlands of South London to an idyllic vicarage in the middle of nowhere, I find it hard to disagree with the Midsomer Murders screenwriter.

Yes, when we were in London, a man was shot right on our doorstep; a boy was stabbed in the park; our cat was killed on the lawn by a devil dog that jumped over our fence; and my wife was mugged on the walk home from the Tube.

Read the rest in the Daily Mail.