A Conservative Energy Manifesto for Theresa May. She’ll Ignore It, Obviously…

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Carl Court/WPA Pool/Getty

Suppose you were a Conservative leader hoping to win a stonking majority in your general election campaign, which of these two manifesto propositions do you think would win the most votes?

a) Our energy policy will remain in the clutches of a cabal of vested interests – rent-seeking, crony capitalist shysters; green ideologues with junk-science degrees in Gaia Studies from the University of East Anglia; eco-fascist lobby groups and NGOs; compromised scientists with their snouts in the trough; goose-stepping technocrats; really, really, really dim MPs – ensuring that the landscape continues to be blighted by an ever-greater-proliferation of shimmery solar panels and ginormous bat-chomping, bird-slicing eco-crucifixes.

We remain committed to the Climate Change Act which will cost the UK economy over £300 billion by 2030, costing each household £875 per annum; and also to the Levy Control Framework (LCF) which, combined with carbon taxes, cost the UK £9 billion in 2016 alone. Then we’ll pretend it’s the fault of the greedy energy companies by hammering them with a price cap – thus driving their share prices down (bad luck pensions and investors!), reducing competition and innovation, and signalling that we intend to be a meddling, interventionist government which has no truck with free market principles.

b) We want consumers and businesses to have the cheapest most reliable energy which causes the least damage to wildlife and the environment and which best guarantees Britain’s energy security. To this end we will scrap all market-distorting subsidies, declare a moratorium on renewables – as well as white elephant projects such as the Hinkley Point C Radioactive Money Pit and the even more lunatic proposed Swansea Tidal Lagoon project – and go all-out to exploit Britain’s superabundant shale gas reserves.

We will, furthermore, appoint a Secretary of State for Energy capable of explaining in ways even thick people can understand why it’s all OK, the baby polar bears aren’t going to drown, nor is Lancashire going to vanish into a crevice, nor are Britain’s gardens going to turn into deserts – despite all that toss you heard from the BBC’s resident Old Etonian eco-loon David Shukman on the Radio 4 Today programme this morning.

Well personally I’m going with b).

What we’re going to get with Theresa May’s Continuation Cameron Conservatives, unfortunately, is far likely to be closer to a).

This is a terrible shame for a number of reasons. As a lover of the British countryside, I’m most especially upset about the ongoing Scotlandification of Mid-Wales with more and more ugly wind farms. If ever you needed an argument against devolved government, there’s your case made for you. The troglodytes in the Welsh Assembly who allow this kind of destruction to pass are not fit to run a bath let alone a Principality.

But it’s also sad for political reasons. Prime Minister Theresa May has a once-in-several-generations opportunity successfully and unapologetically to demonstrate – without any credible threat from her excuse for an Opposition – that conservative principles of small government, personal responsibility, and free markets are genuinely the best way of creating a fairer, more prosperous and freer society.

And she’s about to blow it.

Still, here – if Theresa May wants it –  is an Energy Manifesto prepared for her today by the Global Warming Policy Forum.

Read the rest at Breitbart.

General Election: What Your Voting Choice Ssays about YOU

Here is a quick reference guide to the political types voting in the general election

LABOUR

You are: a millionaire thespian/stand-up comic/generic luvvie; a social worker; an NHS administrator; a Quangocrat; a civil servant; an Islamist entryist; a school teacher; an activist; Owen Jones

You believe in: the NHS; social justice; hard-working families; Keynesian economics; the tooth fairy; the NHS; that the problem with socialism is that it’s never been tried properly yet; the NHS; equality; even if we taxed the rich at 100 per cent it still wouldn’t be enough; did I mention the NHS?

Favourite books: The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists; JK Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy

Favourite albums: oh, God, something by The Clash, I expect; or maybe D:Ream

You shop at: Tesco

PLAID CYMRU

You are: a Welsh social worker; a Welsh NHS administrator; a Welsh quangocrat;  a Welsh civil servant; a Welsh Islamist entryist; a Welsh school teacher (who teaches Welsh – so important for helping Welsh children get on in the world, knowing for example that gwasanaethau means motorway service station, which could come in amazingly handy if say they’re out of petrol on an Autobahn and they chance upon a Welsh speaking German); a Bard; a member of a male voice choir; something to do with Doctor bloody Who which every other employed person in Wales is these days.

You believe in:  “welshing” should be banned because it’s pejorative; the red dragon; the unalienable right of every Welshman, Welshwoman or Welshchild to enjoy – and take pride in – the worst healthcare anywhere in the British Isles or quite possibly the world; wind turbines; pylons.

Favourite books: The Mabinogion; Ivor the Engine; the collected works of Dylan Thomas; Red Dragon by Thomas Harris (Hannibal Lecter was Welsh, look you: played by our Anthony)

Favourite albums: The Best of Shirley Bassey; An Evening with Max Boyce; Treorchy Choir Vol. 3; Barafundle by Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci.

You shop at: Co Op.

CONSERVATIVE

You are: a hedge funder; something in the City; the head of a multi-national corporation; a lawyer; a head-hunter; an offshore wind investor; your job is to find imaginative ways to spend Britain’s eye-wateringly insane foreign aid budget; a Daily Mail reader; just scared, no terrified, of what will happen if Ed Miliband forms a coalition with the SNP and Nick Clegg.

You believe in: better the devil you know; that believing in stuff is all very well but we’re past all that nonsense, don’t you think, these days?

Favourite books: oh, you know, whatever is currently on the bestseller lists

Favourite film: Titanic

Favourite albums: something by the Beatles or the Stones, probably, it has to be really doesn’t it?

You shop at: Waitrose; Sainsbury’s

SNP

You are: Scottish; angry; Scottish; a Scottish Islamist entryist

You believe/ believe in: the Saltire; caltrops; persistent spiders; woad; appalling beer; that the problem with fascism – sorry slip of the tongue there, meant communism – is that it has never properly been tried; that by destroying the landscape with wind farms you’ll drive last of the English settlers out; free further education and free healthcare all paid for by the English; using the phrase “Westminster government” and “privatised NHS” at every opportunity, as a substitute for coherent argument; keeping sterling after (inevitable) independence and using it much as the Greeks did the Euro; that an economy almost entirely dependent on London-funded welfare and wind farm subsidies will suddenly thrive after independence; the cheque’s in the post; deep fried pizza.

Favourite books: Mein Kampf; Trainspotting;

Favourite albums: Big Country; Texas; Arab Strap; Mogwai; Bay City Rollers; Rod Stewart

Favourite films: Trainspotting; Braveheart; Ring of Bright Water (especially when the honest, exploited Scottish labourer bludgeons the wee Sassenach otter)

You shop at: the nearest food bank

Liberal Democrats

You are: a teacher; a jellyfish; something in diversity/equality/[“dis”]-ability; professor of gender studies; a therapist; in therapy; in a mental institution; an Islamist entryist.

You believe: depends where you’re campaigning – if it’s a traditional Tory constituency, then obviously, roast beef, warm beer, lengthening shadows on the village green; if it’s a traditional Labour constituency, then the red flag, collective farms, bullets in the back of the neck for class traitors; and if it’s neither of the above, then sorting out that really nasty pothole on Fore Street, free milk and bananas for the primary school and more, subsidised equality and diversity and baking workshops at the village hall.

Favourite books: The Very Hungry Caterpillar; Arundhati Roy’s The God Of Small Things.

Favourite albums: Whatever the latest in the NOW series is – got to move with the times.

Favourite films: Love Actually; The Girl in the Cafe; The Boat That Rocked

Green Party

You are: an activist; a yoga teacher; an aromatherapist; you run an organic cafe/wholefood store/bicycle repair shop; a poi instructor; a festival caterer; you work for Greenpeace/Friends of the Earth; something in the “sustainability” industry;  currently working at McDonalds waiting to find a more suitable use for your much in-demand Environmental Sciences degree from the University of East Anglia; Dale Vince

You believe: The Earth has a cancer and the cancer is man; Paul Ehrlich’s predictions weren’t wrong, just his timescales; at this rate, all species will be dead by yesterday at the latest; meat is murder; climate change is the worst thing ever and people who deny it should be strung up with piano wire; Wir mussen die Juden aussrotten; bicycles are so lovely, aren’t they? And yurts, and coracles…

Favourite books: anything by Monbiot, he’s just the business.

Favourite albums: Whale Song IV; Dolphin Moods; Chumbawumba; The Levellers; Goa Krusty Trance Classix XVII

Favourite films: An Inconvenient Truth (duh!)

You shop: nowhere if, you can possibly help it. Far better to grow your own or barter. Otherwise Whole Foods.

UKIP

You are: pretty frustrated, right now

You believe in: Morris dancing; cream teas; sunlit uplands with no wind turbines on them; Agincourt; social stigma; grammar schools; Winston Churchill; Shakespeare; Morris Minors; warm beer and a cheeky fag; mowing the lawn; manners; pubs with horse brasses and shove ha’penny; Albion

Favourite films: Zulu; The Italian Job; A Matter of Life And Death; A Canterbury Tale; Where Eagles Dare

Favourite albums: Vaughan Williams’s English Folk Song Suite played by Neville Marriner and the Academy of St Martin in the Fields; Elgar’s Cello Concerto; Jethro Tull’s Songs from the Wood; Traffic’s John Barleycorn Must Die; Led Zep IV

Favourite books: Wind in the Willows (starring the Dear Leader as Mister Toad); The Rats by James Herbert.

You shop: at Aldi and Waitrose.

Read more at Breitbart London

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Unless the Conservatives Come Clean about the Energy Mess They Created, They Will Never Deserve Our Vote

‘Ceci n’est pas un husky.’

Just how stupid does Lynton Crosby think we are?

Very, very, VERY stupid, I’m guessing. And perhaps he’s right. As part of his ongoing campaign to make the Conservatives more electable, he’s inviting us to experience the biggest outbreak of collective amnesia since Odysseus and his crew visited the Land of the Lotus Eaters. He wants us to forget the huskies. And the melting glaciers. And Dave’s announcement from Greenpeace’s HQ, no less that he was going to lead “the greenest government ever”. And to tell ourselves that all these unpopular wind and solar farms, all these rocketing energy prices have nothing whatsoever to do with husky-hugging Dave, leader of the greenest government ever, but with someone else entirely.

Richard North smells a rat here.

I do too. Lots of rats, actually.

Here’s one rat. (Actually, he reminds me more of a neutered poodle). His name is Greg Barker and here he is pretending to feel our pain about all the wind farms blighting our countryside. He’s dressing it up as a mea culpa: Energy Minister admits that some wind farms have been put in “the wrong place.” But it is nothing of the kind. It is part of the Conservatives’ cynical strategy to try to railroad through its offshore wind farms by trying to sell them to a gullible public as a preferable alternative to onshore wind.

And we’re supposed to be grateful for this? Isn’t this a bit like being told by the army besieging your City: “Hey, trapped citizens. Great news! We’ve taken note of your objection that, once you’ve let us through the gates, we’re going to impale every man, woman and child on hot spikes. So instead we’re going to chop your heads off.”

The disastrous Navitus Bay and Atlantic Array offshore projects the ones which will ruin the Dorset coast and utterly devastate the setting of Lundy Island in the Bristol Channel, after all, will require far more taxpayer subsidy (200 per cent, as opposed to 100 per cent) for their useless, intermittent, unreliable, bird-killing, bat-chomping, view-blighting, peace-disturbing, sleep-destroying energy than any onshore wind farms. (Sorry: I can’t bring myself to care about the project off Brighton. It’s God’s punishment for voting Green).

The new deal with the French and the Chinese to build a nuclear power station at Hinckley Point so iniquitous and wrong that even George Monbiot realises it’s a bad idea is another case in point. It’s as terrible as those disastrous PFI hospitals that were inflicted on us in the Blair era: inept government negotiators and greedy corporatists stitching up the market in way that is entirely beyond the consumer’s control. How, in all conscience, can the Coalition express concern about energy prices while simultaneously boasting about their success in striking a deal (for antediluvian technology) which is going to drive them sky high. As Peter Glover says here mini-nukes would have made far more sense.

Or consider the 2008 Climate Change Act, against which only five MPs voted against. The rest including David Cameron were apparently all for introducing the most expensive and pointless legislation in British parliamentary history, guaranteed to cost the taxpayer £18.3 billion a year in needless expenditure (on dubious technologies like carbon capture; and, of course, on wind turbines) till 2050. Yes Ed Miliband may ushered it in as Secretary of State for Energy And Climate Change. But it’s not as if anyone on the Conservative benches save Peter Lilley, Christopher Chope and Andrew Tyrie opposed it.

We have two years until the next General Election and what is already clear as a result of Ed Miliband’s price freeze bribe is that energy prices are going to become a major issue. The only party that has a leg to stand on energy is UKIP, which has consistently noted the flaws in the supposed IPCC consensus and the economic and socio-political dangers of the drive towards unreliable, expensive renewables and the failure to exploit our vast shale gas reserves.

What will be fascinating is to observe how Cameron and co attempt to wriggle out of a mess almost entirely of their own making. There was no need to embrace all that greenery in the way that did. (Whatever Sam Cam may have whispered in Dave’s ear). And God knows, it’s not as though they haven’t had enough opportunities in the last three years to readjust their policies in the light of events. Scarcely a week goes by these days without the Global Warming Policy Foundation presenting such irrefutable evidence from around the world of the disasters being wrought by bad energy policy, and of the decreasing credibility of Man-Made Global Warming Theory. The Conservatives’ ongoing failure in this regard ought to be the single best recruiting sergeant UKIP has.

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One thought on “Unless the Conservatives come clean about the energy mess they created, they will never deserve our vote”

  1. autolycus3 says:28th October 2013 at 10:06 am“The choice is no longer between global warming catastrophe and economic growth but between economic catastrophe and climate sense”Professor Fritz Vahrenholt is one of the fathers of Germany’s environmental movement and the director of RWE Innogy, one of Europe’s largest renewable energy companies

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The Date of the General Election Is…

The date of the General Election is:

May 6th. You read it here first.

How do we know? A contact whose property is used for General and Local election counts tells me he has received a letter from Whitehall asking him to refuse bookings for May 6th and May 7th and to re-arrange anything he has booked.

So May 6th – a Thursday (thanks Clothilde Simon) – is the one then.

18.24 Update: oh poo. According to a Labour Twitter thing when I posted this excitedly on Twitter, it’s just a local election date. Does this mean I’ve got it wrong? Damn! A scoop would have been so cool. Then again, they could be lying couldn’t they. If it’s Labour? I think I’ll leave the post up, just in case I’m right….

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